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Rainbow Snippets

I’ve not been able to do much the last two weeks. Last friday was the final reconstruction of my knee which culminated in SIX separate surgeries at once (that I know of). It is beyond painful know, relearning to walk so I haven’t done much beyond make up exams for my classes.

I figured I’d give one final snippet of my story Homestead at the Beginning of the World in the Fix the World anthology. I’m happy with the reception my story has received. This is more than 6 lines by far but I’m doing this high as a kite from the pain killers so if I can even get it posted is a miracle. Kjell is hanging out cranberry harvesting with Sam’s friends Hope and Tim and their kids

Kjell settled on his belly so he could sun his back and promptly fell asleep. He didn’t wake until something icy slithered down his back. He startled awake to find Sam running a cold bottle of water down his spine. Sam grinned at him.

Wakey, wakey sleeping beauty.”

Kjell grunted rolling up into the sitting position. “Prince Charming is supposed to wake her with a kiss.”

“I would but Hope would explode into hearts and flowers and pester us the rest of the afternoon with her matchmaking.”

“I would,” she assured him unpacking a picnic basket.

“Did you get a nice nap?” Sam asked.

“Yeah.” Kjell rubbed his eyes.

“Man, you are so green!” one of Hope’s kids exclaimed. “That’s so weird.”

“Dylan! That’s rude. Apologize,” Hope snapped, and Dylan mumbled a halfhearted ‘sorry.’

Kjell glanced at his torso. He was pretty damned verdant at this point. “I suppose it is a bit strange.”

“Did one of those damn devil Derjviks do that to you?” Dylan asked, ignoring his mother’s ‘language’ comment.

Kjell nodded. “When I was a baby. I don’t remember it. I’ve always been sort of the color of grass.” He offered the boy a wan smile.

“If they were still around, my dad would kick their butts for you.” Dylan punched the air for emphasis.

“I have no doubt of that.”

“Here, have a sandwich. It’s chicken salad,” Hope said, and when Kjell eyed it suspiciously she sighed heavily. “It’s really chicken. Dammit, Samwise, quit telling people Tim eats aliens. We haven’t done that in years.”

Kjell didn’t comment that statement obviously meant alien truly had been on the menu. He took a tentative bite, treated to something mustardy and creamy at the same time. “This is delicious.”

“Thank you. I try.” Hope beamed. “It only has a little bit of powdered Derjvik bone in it.”

Kjell stopped chewing.

“He went even greener!” Dylan crowed.

BLURB –

We’re a world beset by crises. Climate change, income inequality, racism, pandemics, an almost unmanageable tangle of issues. Sometimes it’s hard to look ahead and see a hopeful future.

We asked sci-fi writers to send us stories about ways to fix what’s wrong with the world. From the sixty-five stories we received, we chose the twelve most amazing (and hopefully prescient) tales.

Dive in and find out how we might mitigate climate change, make war obsolete, switch to alternative forms of energy, and restructure the very foundations of our society.

The future’s not going to fix itself.

Buy Link Amazon

Rainbow Snippet

I am not up to much here, I’m in the hospital one day post-op of my knee reconstruction. I’m in so much pain the narcotics aren’t touching it but I also don’t want to let the Fix the World anthology release to pass me by.

So have a little more from the opening of my story in the anthology, The Homestead at the Beginning of the World.

We left off with a stranger riding up to Sam’s homestea.

The man swung off his bike and made Sam tense when he put a hand in his pocket. He pulled out a wallet, flipping it open to show his ID. “Dr. James broke her leg. I’m her replacement.”

Sam took a step closer. Once upon a time phones would have borne a person’s identification, but the information networks were still in the process of being restored.  Much of human knowledge had been squirreled away and saved but the technology required to bring it back to life was still in the process of being remade. It could take years. He peered closely at the i.d., the face matched but he’d never heard the name Dr. Kjell Eriksen. “Kah-gel?”

Eriksen grinned. “It’s pronounced Shell.”

Blurb –

We’re a world beset by crises. Climate change, income inequality, racism, pandemics, an almost unmanageable tangle of issues. Sometimes it’s hard to look ahead and see a hopeful future.

We asked sci-fi writers to send us stories about ways to fix what’s wrong with the world. From the sixty-five stories we received, we chose the twelve most amazing (and hopefully prescient) tales.

Dive in and find out how we might mitigate climate change, make war obsolete, switch to alternative forms of energy, and restructure the very foundations of our society.

The future’s not going to fix itself.

Buy Link – find it on Amazon here

Rainbow Snippets

Have a nice Easter, Passover, weekend. It doesn’t feel very much like a holiday in skilled nursing when you can’t have visitors. On the other hand I’ve progressed a lot since last week. I am doing well. I’m able to get into and out of most chairs now. They gave me a wheelchair so I’ve been out and about rolling in the halls. But mostly I’m here on the computer teaching my classes. Still not writing much other than fanfic to keep me writing (With all the pain and pain killers I don’t have the ability to world build)

Have a little more of The Homestead at the Beginning of the World from the Fix the World anthology. It’s a wee bit more than 6 lines.

A motorcycle, old but kitted out for biofuels, sailed up the road more gracefully than Sam expected. It was as if the rider had some six sense about where the road needed grading. Dr. James knew, of course, but whoever this was, he was easily a foot taller than she was. He assumed that it was a man but who knew. The Derjviks had experimented with making humans bigger, stronger,  less reliant on food and a whole host of other things. Linda and her scientist friends had said that in some areas of the world there wasn’t a single purely human DNA strand to be found.

The man parked his bike and took off his helmet. Pale, nearly white hair framed his strong jaw. His skin was pale too but tinged with green. Someone in his family – maybe even him – had been spliced with chlorophyll, an aborted experiment in making them into autotrophs. Maybe the Derjvik had wanted to perfect the genetic engineering for their own people. There was a certain advantage in being able to manufacture food from light.

Pre Order link here on Amazon

Blurb – We’re a world beset by crises. Climate change, income inequality, racism, pandemics, an almost unmanageable tangle of issues. Sometimes it’s hard to look ahead and see a hopeful future.

We asked sci-fi writers to send us stories about ways to fix what’s wrong with the world. From the sixty-five stories we received, we chose twelve most amazing (and hopefully prescient) tales.

Dive in and find out how we might mitigate climate change, make war obsolete, switch to alternative forms of energy, and restructure the very foundations of our society, The future’s not going to fix itself.

Rainbow Snippets

It has been awhile. A month ago today I fell at home and landed with my knee hyperextended. I suffered an injury you’d see if I jumped off the roof or something. Broken all three leg bones at the knee, tore almost all the ligaments and tendons. I damaged nerves and blood vessels, nearly lost the leg as a result. I’ve had three surgeries and have one to go. I’ve spent the last month hospitalized. I’ll spend all of April the same. I won’t start relearning how to walk until May. I wasn’t clear headed for a while between pain relieves, anxiety meds and muscle relaxers so I fell off the radar. Hoping to get back into it now.

I’m taking a break from These Haunted Hills to showcase the characters from my upcoming short story The Homestead at the Beginning of the World in the Fix the World anthology edited by J. Scott Coatsworth

Sam surveyed the glacial lake, blooming green under September’s sun. Some days, he couldn’t believe all of this was his. The Ojibwe had remained stubbornly rooted in their homeland when so many others had been ousted back in the original days of the European colonials and his family had owned this sizeable homestead for generations. He felt honored to be its current custodian.

A century ago, the entire world learned what the Indigenous people had felt all those centuries before: First contact. It certainly hadn’t been as happy as Star Trek would have posited, but the fact, like Shakespeare, that show had remained in the cultural zeitgeist nearly two hundred years later said something for the show. Too bad it hadn’t been accurate where first contact was concerned.

Pre Order link here on Amazon

Blurb –

We’re a world beset by crises. Climate change, income inequality, racism, pandemics, an almost unmanageable tangle of issues. Sometimes it’s hard to look ahead and see a hopeful future.

We asked sci-fi writers to send us stories about ways to fix what’s wrong with the world. From the sixty-five stories we received, we chose twelve most amazing (and hopefully prescient) tales.

Dive in and find out how we might mitigate climate change, make war obsolete, switch to alternative forms of energy, and restructure the very foundations of our society,

The future’s not going to fix itself.

Rainbow Snippets

One Day I won’t be running late but that day is not today.


Here’s a bit of a longer snippet of <i>These Haunted Hills</i>. Brendan is still talking with his ex about Josh as he shows her ghost hunting videos.

She started the second video but almost immediately paused it. She turned the phone toward him. “He is an absolute doll baby. How old is he? He can’t be old enough to have a PhD, I swear.”

“He does look  young but he has to be in his late twenties. He’s younger than us but he’s not a kid.”

“Bren, hon, what did he say when he saw this video?”

“Why do you ask?”

“Because your target zone seems a bit off in this.”

“Oh, that was the wrong one. I thought I saw something following Josh and I’m not that good with a camera.”

“Please. I’ve known you for decades. You’re fine with a camera. You’re not trying to spot a ghost. You’re following his ass.”

“Heather!” The blush on his face could have reheated the dregs of his cappuccino.

“You are! It’s a mighty fine ass, too.”

Brendan chuckled. “It is. His job has him hiking out in the woods all the time. His backside is toned!”

“And you can’t keep your eyes off it. Did you even let him see this video?”

“Shut it! Yes, I did. He believed me that I was trying to track a shadow.”